Butterfly Conservation - saving butterflies, moths and our environment
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saving butterflies, moths and our environment
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Moths of the month: June 2010

This is a monthly series illustrating several characteristic moths to look out for in our area. Text and photos by Roy Leverton.

You can also view the other months by selecting the links at the bottom of this page.

   
Broad-barred White, Hecatera bicolorata (photo by Roy Leverton)

Broad-barred White Hecatera bicolorata

Late May to early July.

Coastal sand dunes, waste ground, arable farmland.

Though at the northern limit of its British range here, this chunky little noctuid has quite a stronghold in the inner Moray Firth.

Its caterpillar feeds on the flowers and buds of hawkweeds, sow-thistles and related plants.

Occasionally the adult can be found sitting on fence posts.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Pebble Prominent, Notodonta ziczac (photo by Roy Leverton)

Pebble Prominent Notodonta ziczac

Mid May to mid July.

Woodland, scrub, sallow carr.

One of the commonest members of its family, Pebble Prominent can be expected wherever sallows or poplars grow.

It is easiest to find in the caterpillar stage, however, as the adult is rarely seen except at light traps.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Silver Hook, Deltote uncula (photo by Roy Leverton)

Silver Hook Deltote uncula

June.

Marshes, boggy moorland with sedges and cotton-grass.

This small noctuid has a very patchy distribution in Britain. In the Highlands it is decidedly western, being absent from apparently identical habitat further east (much like Marsh Fritillary).

Where present it is often abundant, and the adults are easily flushed from the vegetation on sunny days.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Cream Wave, Scopula floslactata (photo by Roy Leverton)

Cream Wave Scopula floslactata

Late May to early July?

Woodland, scrub, heathland.

Cream Wave is widely distributed in the Highlands, though apparently local and rarely numerous. It can be distinguished from the much commoner Smoky Wave by its wiggly crosslines.

Adults rest on foliage and are sometimes disturbed by day.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Clouded Buff, Diacrisia sannio (photo by Roy Leverton)

Clouded Buff Diacrisia sannio

June into July.

Heathland and heather moorland

This exotic-looking tiger moth is widely distributed in the Highlands, though local and commonest in the west.

The yellowish male is often active on sunny days, though the redder female (illustrated) is less often seen.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


View other months

January - February

March

April

October

November - December

2008: May | June | July | August | September

2009: May | June | July | August | September

2010: May | June | July | August | September

2011: May | June | July | August | September

2012: May | June | July | August | September

2013: May | June | July | August | September

2014: May | June | July | August | September

2015: May | June | July | August | September

2016: May | June | July | August | September

2017: May | June | July | August

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