Butterfly Conservation - saving butterflies, moths and our environment
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saving butterflies, moths and our environment
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Moths of the month: June 2011

This is a monthly series illustrating several characteristic moths to look out for in our area. Text and photos by Roy Leverton.

You can also view the other months by selecting the links at the bottom of this page.

   
Pine-tree Lappet (R Leverton)

Pine-tree Lappet Dendrolimus pini

June into July (or perhaps earlier?).

Scots pine woodland and plantations.

All the evidence suggests this large moth is a very local ancient resident in Scotland, rather than a recently introduced pest. It is a low-density species and most of its two-year life cycle takes place high in the canopy, explaining why it was previously overlooked

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Broken-barred Carpet (R Leverton)

Broken-barred Carpet Electrophyaes corylata

Late May to early July.

Deciduous woodland and scrub.

The jagged disruptive pattern of this moth distinguishes it from the various similar carpets.

Although its caterpillar feeds on various trees, in our area it is mainly found in birch woods. The adult rests on the trunks but is easily disturbed into flight.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Small Elephant Hawk-moth (R Leverton)

Small Elephant Hawk-moth Deilephila porcellus

Late May into July.

Largely coastal in our area.

This colourful little hawk-moth is mainly found along the Moray Firth in our area, being scarce inland and absent from the west.

Its scientific name translates as "dusk-loving piglet".

Unlike its larger cousin, Elephant Hawk-moth, the caterpillar prefers ladies' bedstraw rather than willowherb, whether growing on sea cliffs or in sand dunes.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Coxcomb Prominent (R Leverton)

Coxcomb Prominent Ptilodon capucina

Woodland, parkland, gardens.

Mid May into August, perhaps in two broods.

This is one of the commonest of the small but varied prominent family, characterised by the triangular scale tuft on the forewing's trailing edge.

Even so, the adult is hardly ever seen except at light, though its caterpillar is frequently found on deciduous trees in late summer and autumn.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Grey Arches (R Leverton)

Grey Arches Polia nebulosa

June into August.

Woodland.

This is a common species in the west of our area, but scarce or absent further east.

While a dingy grey like its name suggests over most of its British range, our Highland ones are almost white and altogether more attractive, perhaps for camouflage on birch trunks.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


View other months

January - February

March

April

October

November - December

2008: May | June | July | August | September

2009: May | June | July | August | September

2010: May | June | July | August | September

2011: May | June | July | August | September

2012: May | June | July | August | September

2013: May | June | July | August | September

2014: May | June | July | August | September

2015: May | June | July | August | September

2016: May | June | July | August | September

2017: May | June | July | August

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