Butterfly Conservation - saving butterflies, moths and our environment
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saving butterflies, moths and our environment
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Moths of the month: July 2010

This is a monthly series illustrating several characteristic moths to look out for in our area. Text and photos by Roy Leverton.

You can also view the other months by selecting the links at the bottom of this page.

   
The Pheonix, Eulithis prunata (photo by Roy Leverton)

The Phoenix Eulithis prunata  

July into August.

Gardens and allotments.

As this chocolate-brown moth depends for foodplant on currants and gooseberries, it is rarely if ever found in the open countryside. It tends to be a low-density species, associated with long-established Ribes bushes in old-fashioned kitchen gardens. In our area it is most often recorded from the inner Moray Firth

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Green Arches, Anaplectoides prasina (photo by Roy Leverton)

Green Arches Anaplectoides prasina  

Late June to early August.

Open woodland and scrub.

Most moths in this subfamily are some shade of brown, but this species is a pleasing exception.

Though widespread, it is never particularly numerous, so fresh and unfaded specimens are always a welcome sight. They look particularly stunning when seen by torchlight while feeding at sugar.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Goat Moth, Cossus cossus (photo by Roy Leverton)

Goat Moth Cossus cossus

Late June and July.

Mature, open, deciduous woodland.

This huge and rather primitive wood-boring moth was recently declared a BAP species because of its long-term British decline.

Despite much apparently suitable habitat, only three occupied areas are currently known in Highland, where birch seems to be its tree of choice.

Though it is most easily recorded in the larval stage, adults are occasionally found at rest on tree trunks, looking like a projecting snag or shard of bark.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


Red Carpet, Xanthorhoe decoloraria (photo by Roy Leverton)

Red Carpet Xanthorhoe decoloraria  

Late June to early August.

Moorland and other upland open habitats.

The English name of Red Carpet is a slight exaggeration. It is similar is size and general appearance to various related species. In this example the central band is reddish, but often it is a dull purplish-brown.

Like most of its kind, the adult is easily disturbed into flight by day.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


The Snout, Hypena proboscidalis (photo by Roy Leverton)

The Snout Hypena proboscidalis  

Late June into August.  

Waste ground, roadsides, woodland edge - anywhere with nettles.  

The long palps of this moth give rise to both the English and scientific name. Its shape is equally distinctive: nearly a perfect equilateral triangle.

It can be disturbed from almost any sizeable patch of nettles, usually causing it to fly deeper into the clump. Most are a darker and duller shade of brown than the example illustrated.

Click on the image to enlarge it.


View other months

January - February

March

April

October

November - December

2008: May | June | July | August | September

2009: May | June | July | August | September

2010: May | June | July | August | September

2011: May | June | July | August | September

2012: May | June | July | August | September

2013: May | June | July | August | September

2014: May | June | July | August | September

2015: May | June | July | August | September

2016: May | June | July | August | September

2017: May

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